Tag Archives: business

In electronics, Porter’s “Five Forces” are powerful. Logistics represent a means by which economies can be achieved through efficiency improvements. Such improvements can translate into better service, which provides differentiation. Resultant cost savings can benefit the customer, who can pay lower prices.

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Analysis of the Marketability of the Current Logistics Chain

The following diagram is an approximate illustration of a consumer electronics source-to-UK-customer supply chain.

Mapping a supply chain allows managers to understand the durations, directions, costs, complexities, and constraints of its flows. The principle underlying logistics management is competitive advantage through logistical efficiency. Management of the logistical activities within a supply chain typically begins with a mapping of the major flows. Mapping can thus be considered the first step toward achieving/increasing competitive advantage through improvement/simplification of logistical activities.

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The SWOT is a useful - if sometimes not fully understood - tool for identifying a company's current and relative (not long-term or absolute) strengths and weaknesses. Done competently, a SWOT analysis can help develop strategy. However, the efficacy of a SWOT is often degraded by the biases of the author or the quality of the data available to the author. The following example is based on a Japanese company's UK operations division and concentrates on logistical considerations.

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The Human Capital Index, which compares the practices of 2000 companies world-wide, found that superior human resource management correlates positively with financial returns (Watson-Wyatt, 2007). A firm's “genetic code” is mainly the composite of its employees’ capabilities, knowledge, and integration. The quality, creativity, self-perception, thinking, and actions of employees is the DNA of the firm. Since few firms are democracies, high-level decision makers are valuable. The genetic code of the firm is a better predictor of success than distinctive or core competencies (Koch, 2011).

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