Logistics

Set-Up Times and Stock Levels

Gearing machines to produce right-hand drive components poses disruption to flow due to switchover times. For this reason, production runs will have to be estimated. MCC and its partners must factor in some level of buffer stock for these components. Since it is possible that MCC will run short on these components, and reconfiguring machines in the middle of a standard left-hand drive run will not be immediately possible, stockouts could result. Unplanned switches between sidedness for single units will be impracticable. To counter this, some degree of batch planning for right hand-drive components will be necessary.

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Leanness, Stock, and Supplier Strain

In the current supply chain management literature, “lean thinking” principles hold that high stock or inventory levels within a process leads to problems. These may be as simple as storage costs, inconvenience, or cash flow problems. However, excess stock can mask many serious problems within an organisation’s supply chain, such as overlong set-up times and bottlenecks. This is demonstrated in the “River and Rocks” analogy: reducing inventory enables management to identify potential problems and address them. Progressive inventory reduction could also be seen as a kaizen principle of continual improvement, since kaizen promotes attainment of efficiency through reductive measures (Schonberger, 1982).

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Testing and Measuring Quality and Performance

Complex, multipart components, such as engines, have a higher probability of failure so must undergo check processes more frequently than simpler swappable parts or fittings. Benchmarking must identify the subcomponents most prone to failure. Checking processes must be frequent and thorough. Failed components are removed from the system; achieving components are installed.

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